Paul Wang
Singapore Urban Sketchers

ARTIST WRITEUP – ‘Don’t forget to artfully Wonder & Wander!’

Paul is an Interior Architecture & design graduate and with scholarship continued to study Technical Theatre in Australia. Besides designing for the theatre and architecture, his passion for teaching became a natural extension of his creativity. As an art and design educator, he has taught visual arts at the Singapore International School in Hong Kong and is currently an adjunct lecturer at Temasek Polytechnic’s school of design in Singapore. Other than teaching students, he also conducts regular art & design workshops for Singapore art and geography school teachers. Inspired by his theatre design training, his sketches are often bursting with dramatic colours. His strokes and splashes may look spontaneous but are highly choreographed. His distinctive style of vivid colours and convoluted details seeks to tell a story behind each sketch. Urban sketching has become his unique way of encapsulating the fast changing urban landscape here in Singapore and abroad. Paul is an Urban Sketchers’ correspondent for Singapore since 2010 and is currently serving as an advisory board-member for Urbansketchers organisation.

Major artworks

Paul Wang, art & design educator & travelling urban sketcher

Shophouses at Dickson Road, Little India, Singapore

Inspired by the shophouses along Dickson road at Little India, I want to preserve a small piece of history that is slowly disappearing from our landscape. Our forefathers came from afar to set up life in Singapore. Shops on the ground floor and their family home upstairs. They also built and combined ideas from both western and tropical indigenous architecture. This is a fine example of their adaptability to a new world.

Shophouses at Princep Street, Singapore.

Inspired by the colourful shophouses along Princep street, I want to preserve a small piece of history that is slowly disappearing from our landscape. Prinsep Street has undergone a transformation where there is little left of its forgotten past. Thiswas once Singapore’s Jewish Quarter, the Mahallah and this street has probably seen the most dramatic changes since the turn of the last century. This street also made some notable contributions to healthcare in Singapore and was where the island’s first Maternal and Child Health Clinic was set up in 1923.

Armenian Street revisited Singapore 

Inspired by the shophouses along Armenian Street, I want to preserve a small piece of history that is slowly disappearing from our landscape. Named after the Armenian Church of St Gregory the Illuminator which was built in 1835, it was originally called Armenian Church Street. The string of shophouses lining the street has been there since the 1930s.

To the Market, Little India, Singapore

The sketch was inspired by the colourful shophouses at Clive street, Little India. Vegetables of all sorts are found here. The smell is intense and very distinct too. Here at the little market stall you can also experience what life must be like when our forefathers came to Singapore to start a new life.

Welcome Home!

Inspired by all things Peranakan, you are invited to come in and find out more about this marriage of different cultures. Peranakan generally refers to people of mixed Chinese and Malay/Indonesian heritage. Many Peranakans trace their origins to 15th-century Malacca where their ancestors were thought to be Chinese traders who married local women. This hybrid of Chinese, Malay and Western cultures has created very unique art, fashion and food.

Finding Joy

Sometimes the smallest and most insignificant moments can bring us much joy. We just need to look closely and discoverhidden gems. Don’t forget to count your blessings too!

Shophouses at Tyrwhitt Road, Singapore.

Inspired by the colourful shophouses along Tyrwhitt road, I want to preserve a small piece of history that is slowly disappearing from our landscape. Our forefathers came from afar to set up life in Singapore. Shops on the ground floor and their family home upstairs. They also built and combined ideas from both western and tropical indigenous architecture. This is a fine example of their adaptability to a new world.

Rise & Shine!

How do you start your day? I like to wake up to the smell of kopi (local coffee) and fresh kaya toasts (coconut jam). I like my kopi strong with a dash of condensed milk and my kaya toasts served warm & crunchy. Now I am ready to rise and shine!

Mrs.Tan’s old coffeeshop, Kuching.

I fell in love with Mrs Tan’s old coffeeshop when I visited Kuching. This old coffeeshop has not change much since opening 70years ago and is full of history. Coming here for coffee is like stepping back into the past. Even the furniture have a story to tell.

Some Ideas on our Products